Energy and Climate

CLIMATE CHANGE

EFFICIENCY & TECHNOLOGY

RENEWABLE ENERGY

 

The Mission to Cut Emissions in the Fight Against Climate Change

Climate change will have significant effects on people and the planet, and using our Five Principles as a guide, we’re committed to being part of the solution.

That’s why we’ve set targets to reduce our emissions in absolute terms, regardless of business growth. Through our Sustainable in a Generation (SiG) program, we aim to eliminate GHG emissions from our operations by 2040 as well as reduce emissions from product deliveries to retail customers.

With firmly defined goals and collaboration from scientific experts, we are activating change from every corner of our company.

CLIMATE CHANGE

The consequences of climate change – changing rainfall patterns, floods, droughts, and the spread of pests and diseases – are putting whole habitats and communities at risk. In fact, they could negatively affect our farmers’ crops, threatening their livelihood and our business.

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CLIMATE CHANGE

The consequences of climate change – changing rainfall patterns, floods, droughts, and the spread of pests and diseases – are putting whole habitats and communities at risk. In fact, they could negatively affect our farmers’ crops, threatening their livelihood and our business.

Mars, Incorporated Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Meaningful emissions-reduction strategies and targets must address GHGs across our value chain. Using the Greenhouse Gas Protocol1, and other relevant data sources, we have calculated our GHG emissions as follows:

  • 6%: scope 1 emissions from direct energy and fuel consumption in our factories, offices and vehicles

  • 8%: scope 2 emissions from purchased electricity used in our factories and offices

  • 86%: scope 3 emissions from purchased raw materials2, packaging3 and other goods and services, plus other aspects of our value chain, such as transportation of raw materials and products, business travel, our products in use and waste generated in our operations4.

Tackling scope 1 and 2 emissions

Based on the IPCC estimates of what is necessary to prevent dangerous levels of climate change, we have committed to eliminating GHG emissions from our factories and offices (our operations) by 2040.

  • We have set an interim target to reduce operational emissions by 25 percent by 2015 in absolute terms, from a 2007 baseline.

  • We are working to reduce Scope 1 emissions from the company cars Mars owns or leases through better route planning to reduce mileage, for example.

Tackling scope 3 emissions

Approximately 65 percent of our scope 3 emissions and 56 percent of our total GHG emissions relate to the production of the goods and services we purchase, and agricultural raw materials in particular. Agriculture releases GHG emissions in many ways, including energy used during farming and the production of pesticides, fertilizers and animal feeds, methane and/or nitrous oxide from livestock, crops and fertilizer use, and land use changes, such as forest clearance.

    • To find lasting and scalable ways to reduce emissions in our supply chain, we are collaborating with scientific experts and partners including the University of California, Davis, The Sustainability Consortium, the Sustainable Food Lab, the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative Platform and the University of Cambridge to develop a strategy for fostering sustainable agriculture in our supply chain.

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    EFFICIENCY AND TECHNOLOGY

    Improving efficiency is the most immediate and cost-effective way to reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The less fossil-fuel energy we use, the fewer carbon emissions we produce. We measure the efficiency of existing practices, invest in technology and processes that use less power, and are driving down energy use through changes in behavior.

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    EFFICIENCY AND TECHNOLOGY

    Improving efficiency is the most immediate and cost-effective way to reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The less fossil-fuel energy we use, the fewer carbon emissions we produce. We measure the efficiency of existing practices, invest in technology and processes that use less power, and are driving down energy use through changes in behavior.

    • In Baddi, India, Wrigley is saving more than 25,000 kilowatt hours of energy a year having installed thermostatic controls that switch off air-conditioning units when an area is cool enough, and motion sensors that automatically shut off lighting in areas with less traffic.

    • A team of Associates at Mars Drinks, Basingstoke, U.K., has implemented a number of energy-saving projects, from switching off lights in unoccupied areas to optimizing the building management system. This has saved around 1,000 kilowatt-hours per week.

    • The Mars Drinks, Basingstoke, U.K. site also replaced a total of 378 light fittings with energy efficient alternatives, which improved the quality of light and reduced energy consumption. This will cut energy use in the office by approximately nine percent and save £11,000 a year.

    • Associates at Mars Food’s Oud-Beijerland factory in the Netherlands reduced energy consumed at the site by 18 percent over three years. To achieve this reduction, the site modified the way process water is heated and improved the control of cooling water pumps.

    • Mars Food Australia, Wyong, installed a state-of-the-art co-generation plant in 2010, efficiently generating power and thermal energy from a single fuel source, in this case natural gas. This has contributed to a 19 percent reduction in GHG emissions per tonne of product. In its first year, the site saved AU$726,000 in electricity costs and reduced GHG emissions by 1,300 tonnes.

    • Mars Food in Olen, Belgium, has invested US$500,000 in a pilot project to research new technologies for drying rice. This could reduce GHG emissions by up to 50 percent compared to current drying operations.

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    RENEWABLE ENERGY

    There are big environmental and economic benefits of sourcing renewable energy. That’s why we’re constantly searching for opportunities to install renewable energy sources at existing and future operations. From locally sourced hydropower to energy-saving solar power, our initiatives are already reducing energy use, emissions and costs across the globe.

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    RENEWABLE ENERGY

    There are big environmental and economic benefits of sourcing renewable energy. That’s why we’re constantly searching for opportunities to install renewable energy sources at existing and future operations. From locally sourced hydropower to energy-saving solar power, our initiatives are already reducing energy use, emissions and costs across the globe.

    • One Mars Chocolate and three Mars Petcare sites in Brazil use hydropower from a supplier to meet their energy needs.

    • Mars Petcare in Bokros, Hungary, has begun using local thermal springs as a renewable energy source of heating and hot water. Although it required a large initial investment, the equipment has already reduced the site’s office and social room’s natural gas use by 80 percent, and will cut costs and greenhouse gas emissions over time.

    • Wrigley factories in Shanghai and Guangzhou, China; Poznan, Poland; Porici, Czech Republic; and Biesheim, France all treat wastewater anaerobically, which provides renewable energy in the form of biogas.

    • At our European sites, we use the biogas to heat water and fuel boilers. This approach prevents methane from being released into the atmosphere, in addition to reducing our consumption of fossil-fuel-derived natural gas by approximately three percent annually at these sites.

    • Mars Chocolate’s Henderson site in Nevada, U.S., has installed a 4.4 acre solar garden, which generates 1.25 million kilowatt hours of energy per year. This supports 100 percent of the site’s electricity needs when the sun is shining, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 867 tonnes per year – the equivalent of removing 170 vehicles from the road.

    • Some Wrigley factories are employing solar power to cut energy use. For example, the site in Chattanooga, Tennessee, U.S., has installed 240 solar panels across nearly 4,000 square feet of roof space, which generate more than 170,000 kilowatt-hours of energy each year.

    • In Guangzhou, China, we use solar energy to warm water for showers, hand-washing stations and equipment-cleaning procedures. This reduces greenhouse gas emissions by nearly 200 tonnes, the equivalent of taking 34 cars off the road each year.

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    Mars Massive Wind Farm Powers Entire U.S. Operations

    Mesquite Creek Wind, a new 200-megawatt wind farm touts 25K acres, 118 turbines and 800K MWh – efficient energy for all 70 sites in the U.S. This makes Mars the first major food business to source all of its electricity for its U.S. operations from renewable sources.

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    Mars Speaks Out on Climate Change: “The time is now for global collaboration and action”

    Mars recognizes the threat of climate change and we believe that as a big global business, we must do our part to help tackle the challenge. We are taking advantage of this month’s Climate Week in New York and December’s United Nation’s Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris to underscore our commitment to doing our part to tackle global climate change—and to call on business and governments to do more.

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    Mars Unites with Global Food Companies on Climate Action

    In partnership with other leading food and beverage companies, Mars appeals to all US and global leaders participating in the 2015 United Nation’s Conference of Parties (COP21) Their ask? That businesses and governments commit to do more to combat climate change.

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    Mars Jumps to #6 on List of Biggest Green Power Users

    Mars has been ranked #6 on the Environmental Protection Agency's list of 100 biggest green power users in the U.S., further recognizing our commitment to using cleaner energy. Along with the ranking, Mars is now an EPA Green Power Partner and a member of the agency's Green Power Leadership.

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